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Coronavirus update

You can still travel to donate. Giving blood and platelets is essential to the NHS and vulnerable patients. Please keep donating.

Find out the latest updates

O positive blood type

Your blood type is determined by genes inherited from your parents. Whether your blood type is rare, common or somewhere in between, your donations are vital in helping save and improve lives.

You can register online to give blood 

How common is O positive blood?

1 in 3 donors is O positive

O positive is the most common blood type as around 35% of our blood donors have it.

The second most common blood type is A positive (30%), while AB negative (1%) is the rarest.

A young woman holds a sign that says, "I'm blood type O+"

Who can receive O positive blood?

Anyone with an Rh positive blood type

Anyone with an Rh positive blood type can receive O positive red blood cells – so that’s A positive, B positive and AB positive as well as O positive.

That means 3 in 4 people, or around 76% of the population, can benefit from your donation.

Find out how the RH system works

What blood can O positive people receive?

Blood from O positive and O negative donors

People with O positive blood can receive donations from:

  • O positive blood donors
  • O negative blood donors

Why is O positive blood important?

It’s always in demand

O positive is the blood type most commonly requested by hospitals so we need to make sure there is a steady supply.

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Become a blood donor

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Want to become a donor?

More information about the different blood types that provide a lifeline to all kinds of patients

WYT O+  - Still 2.jpg

Blood type materials

Cards and fact sheets about different blood types to download and share

View materials